Picture3small  2014-05-30-CrackedFacebookLogoWEB  more youtube logo Web  unnamed   bnglogo   AudioNow

Taiwan National Day Parade

Sunday, October 7, 2012, Boston, MA 

 

By Molly Jou

Media Relations, AsianBoston Media Group

twparade

Today marks the 101st birthday of Taiwan, Republic of China. The Republic of China declared its liberation on October 10th, 1911. On behalf of the celebration, the Taiwanese people of New England gathered in Boston’s Chinatown for a parade and flag-raising ceremony. I witnessed the excitement and passion from the students and seniors alike in the crowd. Even though most of the seniors came to the U.S. long ago, they are proud to be Taiwanese.

The Taiwan National Day parade started from the Chinatown Gate and continued to Government Center. The parade was lead by two costumes, which Taiwanese call, San-Tai-Zu (the third prince). A student from Northeastern University, Ricky Yang, carried one of the San-Tai-Zus. He expressed his feelings with “honor” and “pride” in leading the procession on this special occasion. Soon after the parade ended in the plaza of Government Center, traditional dances and performances were held to enlighten the celebration. The ‘sky-blue, white-sun, and red-earth’ flags of Taiwan were waving everywhere in the plaza. Many people were dressed in the colors of the flag, and some students even tattooed the flag on their cheeks. As I walked through the crowd, I found a few people who were not Taiwanese. They first participated in the celebration out of curiosity, but then were happy to have been there in support of their Taiwanese friends. 

The most exciting part of the event was the ceremonial raising of the Taiwanese flag, while the National Anthem of Taiwan was sung by Judith Lin. It was a moment that everyone felt the joy of celebrating National Day of Taiwan in their second country. The celebration ended with a country song that echoes in almost every Taiwanese’s memory. As proud Taiwanese, we should all remember our roots and support each other.

The strength of Taiwan is enduring.

 

For more photos, please go to https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/102113786662651596840/albums/5797344967945185777